Thoughts on using a JPH CT360

Chris Cameron from Platinum Compost talks compost turners

Thoughts on using a JPH CT360 Windrow Turner.

Chris Cameron
Director of Production, Platinum Compost Pty Ltd
Toowoomba , Queensland.

To whom it may concern.

 

My name is Chris Cameron, I currently live in South-East Queensland, and I have been working with Biological Agriculture for over 50 years, working out how best to restore productivity to our ancient and weathered Australian soils. The problem, once understood properly, is not difficult.  We lack Organic Matter, many essential minerals have been leached out over the eons, and we lack beneficial soil biology in most areas.

About 20 years ago I managed to make the jump from garden scale compost making up to paddock scale, as well-made compost, and what can be blended with it, will quickly reverse most of our problems. My first major work was done with an old end loader, slow and inefficient, but effective in the end.  Output with it was very low.

Over the intervening years I have worked with six different Compost Turners of varying types, American, European, Australian Factory built, Australian “home built”, and am currently using a Queensland designed and built JPH CT360, a tractor pulled, PTO driven machine.

It is quite different in design to any of the Turners I have used previously, in that it does not have a huge counterweight and hydraulics that allow the turning mechanism to stand upright for transport.  Initially I felt this may be a problem if I got “bogged” in a new windrow, but after having run through, effectively, 20K tons of material I have had absolutely no problem.  Without the huge counterweight the machine is light and easy to manoeuvre, the way it folds in behind the tractor for transport is quick, easy, and effective.  As there is not a huge weight of machine ever up in the air, it is also far safer to work around!

With the obvious exception of using a Loader to turn windrows, every Turner I have used in the past has had a habit of throwing heavy bits forward, causing some glass breakages on the towing tractors, and needing special screens to prevent this happening, restricting somewhat the clear view of what is happening behind.

The very different “tyne and paddle” design of the JPH machine greatly reduces this and I run safely with no screen and the tractor back window open to give me the most uninterrupted view of what is happening.  This is a great development!

This same drum design and layout, which is so different from the majority of Turners, is extremely efficient in doing the 3 tasks needed of a Turner: complete inversion of the windrow, rapid reduction of particle size, and even incorporation of mineral additives, if these are used.  Feedlot manure, my main feedstock, can arrive in huge chunks almost as hard as concrete and these are rapidly reduced to a fine texture.

One of the best features of this machine is its extremely low power requirement!  The biggest machine I used in North Queensland a monster spanning over 5M needed over 300hp to drive it, and the tractor struggled.  I am pulling this JPH CT360, with a small tractor with about 80 PTO hp and its in-cab readout reports I am using barely 30% of available power for a full-sized windrow!  This is exceptional!

On the service and maintenance side, everything that needs regular service is easy to see, and access.  This means that maintenance is not ignored because it is too hard to do regularly.

I am delighted with this machine and would have no hesitation in recommending it, or its “brothers”, and plan on using more in the near future.

 

The tractor we are using, a JD6110R.

The tractor we are using, a JD6110R.

normal windrow size

Normal windrow size, full width of machine being used, as the material settles.

Turning and watering

Turning and watering.

Power usage indicator in tractor cabin.
Power usage indicator in tractor cabin.

Minerals ready to incorporate

Minerals ready to incorporate.

Turning in minerals

Turning in minerals.

Windrow after one incorporation pass

Windrow after one incorporation pass.

Thank you,
Chris Cameron
Production Manager,
Platinum Compost Pty Ltd.
Toowoomba, Queensland.

on-site compost training

Soil Improvement Training

At OZ turners we’ve been pleased to see the upturn in the recognition that soil training can bring to a agricultural environment and the planet as a whole.  We’ve long been a supporter and believer of Dr. Elaine Ingram that soil is a complete ecosystem and needs to be looked at as a whole not simply by putting on nitrogen based fertilisers. The toxic chemicals in conventional agriculture are KILLING insects, and microbes. Then when those chemicals accumulate, they can kill larger organisms, like people. What Dr. Elaine Ingham does is teach people how to reverse these chemical dependencies.

To help you along with made a list of courses and information run by both the government and private providers all over the country we will be expanding this list as the as we go along keeping you up-to-date on what you can learn more on improving your sorrow soil and the results that you get from your farm.   We firmly maintain the LJPH equipment compost Turner’s out the market cleaning trailers and best value in the whole of Australia.  Improving your soil holistic Lee is a will return benefits for many years to come and will not simply wash away or evaporate with the next rain

Take a moment to look through a list if you know more we would love to hear when looking to build a complete list of compost and soil management training for the whole of Australia and New Zealand. 


Manage organic soil improvement – LINKPDF

AHCORG403 –

Byron Community College

Soils – Organic Management – PDC Module D

Get to know your own soil – what is it made of, what will grow well in it and how you can improve your soil to make the most of what it has to offer. Delve into the world of compost, soil nutrition and microbiology as we explore some of the myriad of ways you can build a healthy, fertile, robust soil through organic practices that will help you to grow food packed full of life force. LINK

Learning Cloud – Soil Management

Learning Cloud offer Nationally Accredited Diplomas and Certificates that are recognised by the government, employers, registered training organisations and universities. Completing these courses will position you as a qualified and sought after graduate. LINK

 

 

 

Workshop Location Size (MB)
2015 – Soil Refresher Training Course Queensland 64 (total)
2010 Soil Health workshop Brisbane 23.2
2009 ‘Back to the Basics’ Understanding Soils Workshop Brisbane 14.6
2009 ‘Back to the Basics’ Understanding Soils Workshop Cairns 16.5
2009 An Introduction to the Theory Measurement and Interpretation of Soil Chemical Properties Brisbane and Toowoomba 8.5
2008 Understanding Soils Workshops ‘Back to the Basics’ Rockhampton 11.5
2007 Back to the Basics’ Understanding Soils Workshop Toowoomba and Brisbane 6.9
2005 Soils refresher training course Toowoomba 7.2
2002 Understanding soils soils data and land management issues Cairns 6.7
2000 Understanding soils soils data and land management issues Toowoomba 10.6
1996 Land management for urban development Brisbane 6.5
1993 Environmental soil science – a training course for the non soils specialist Brisbane 7.3
1988 Understanding soils and soil data Brisbane 8.1
1985 Identification of soils and interpretation of soil data Brisbane 15.9

NSW DPI

Fertilisers and soil improvement

Richard Hawkes was working as an agronomist when he decided to grow a small trial patch of potatoes using compost

Using Compost to improve crop yields

Richard Hawkes was working as an agronomist when he decided to grow a small trial patch of potatoes using compost to improve crop yields on his family’s 56ha property at Boneo, on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula.

Now that patch has grown into 16ha with seven varieties — about 80 per cent of which is sold through Sydney and Melbourne wholesale markets, with the remainder sold through a farmgate shop — in ­addition to their crops of carrots, spring onions, parsley and radish. From from next year they will lease an additional 6ha of land. Given the soil is sandy, Richard said he works hard to retain moisture and nutrients, with crop rotation key to high yields.

“A Compost spreader is an expensive piece of machinery
but in the long-term I believe it will pay for itself,
because we’ll have happy worms, grow better crops
and make more money,” Richard said.

An ideal two-yearly paddock rotation would start with a green-manure crop of broccoli. In the past a break crop has been caliente mustard, but this year Richard has leased land to broccoli growers, in order to get a harvestable crop that provides a boost to ­organic matter and breaks the weed cycle. Broccoli is grown for eight weeks, followed by potatoes, then carrots, spring onions, and radish, then repeated.

SOIL TESTING TIME

SOIL is tested annually for ­nutrition and an agronomist advises on soil needs. “As much as I’d love to be hands on, working as an agronomist, my role is now as a generalist.” With an annual average rainfall of 450mm, soil is constantly monitored for moisture, with solid set computer-controlled irrigation applying both bore water and class a ­recycled water from the Eastern Treatment Plant.  He said potato farming on sandy soil was a balance of irrigation and disease pressure — “every time you water you create a disease event, it’s a ­vicious cycle” — with small amounts of fungicide ­applied following irrigation.

 

Hawkes Farm Store is a family run business that sells produce grown on site, as well as products from local growers. The aim of the store is to bring together great produce from around the Peninsula.

 

 

 

READ MORE
About Hawkes Vegetables
Mornington Peninsula farmer Richard Hawkes has eyes on the future
SARAH HUDSON, The Weekly Times
October 17, 2017 11:00pm